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Aims and Objectives
History
Future
What have we acheived so far?

 
Aims and Objectives

The European Network of Quitlines (ENQ) is an initiative aimed at maximising collaboration between all European Union member countries in tobacco control and smoking cessation.

The main aims and objectives of the ENQ are:

  • To promote and support European Quitlines as a public health intervention that is clinically and cost effective in helping European smokers in quitting successfully
  • To share expertise and experience- disseminate evidence base and share best practice
  • To raise the quality of services through out Europe by establishing standards
  • To assist those wishing to establish new Quitlines
  • Build upon the Network’s success of the first three years and extend the development and promotion of quality standards throughout the European Network of Quitlines
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of the Quitlines operating throughout Europe, to assess which factors influence success, and to find out what kind of assistance is sought (and received) by what kind of smokers.
  • Establish the evidence base for the clinical and cost effectiveness of Quitlines as an essential component of a comprehensive tobacco control programme
History

The idea to have a European wide network of Quitlines was first discussed at the Second European Conference on Tobacco and Health held in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria in Februray 1999. It was then developed into the ENQ later that year with a conference in London of the interested parties.

Originally a steering group comprising independent operators of telephone-counselling helplines from six member states met and set the initial framework of the ENQ.

The group agreed that Quitlines had the advantage of being services that had:

  • Large reach and impact as a public health intervention
  • Improved accessibility to smoking cessation services for many disadvantaged groups
  • Relatively low costs as a smoking cessation method
  • The ability to support large numbers of smokers
  • The Quitlines encompassed a range of practice and experience

The group formally presented the idea to the 11th World Conference on Tobacco and Health held in Chicago USA in August 2000.

The ENQ was formally launched in September 2001 with our 1st conference held in Barcelona Spain. The event had Quitlines from Carlifornia (USA), Victoria (Australia) and Auckland (New Zealand) sharing evidence base and best practice with European Quitlines from Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Holland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Norway, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and UK.

The Network is a European Union funded initiative in association with the European Network of Smoking Prevention (ENSP)

Future

Developing and extending the Network to accession countries
The European Network of Quitlines has grown from 6 to 15 members now. We will now be welcoming ten new members from the accession countries to build a 25 member strong network. The European Network of Quitlines will be holding a seminar in London, during the summer of 2004 to officially invite them on-board.

Quality Standard Accreditation Scheme
The ENQ will also be concentrating on the development of ENQ Quality Standard Accreditation, and publication of the helpline model and Code of Practice, incorporating best practice tools, which will inform, support and advance policy development in tobacco as one of the priorities of the Community Health Strategy.

– STIVORO/ENQ
The STIVORO/ENQ research will assess what factors influence success in conjunction with Quitlines. Special attention will be paid to the impact of new EU directives on European Quitlines, for example quitline numbers appearing on cigarette packs, in conjunction with the European directive 2001/37/EC on labelling.

The Project will result in concrete recommendations on how Quitlines should be organised and run to have the maximum impact on smoking behaviour. STIVORO/ENQ propose an effectiveness study using one pretest and one postest. The key areas of the questionnaire have been mapped out with member groups. A sample of 500 callers per country will be screened, and then 12 months after the call, the respondents will be interviewed by telephone from a central research centre. Various outcome measures will be used to assess success:

  • Appreciation of the help that was received,
  • Progression in stage of change,
  • Increase in self – efficacy,
  • Use of evidence based cessation method,
  • Reduction in tobacco consumption,
  • Successful quit attempts and long-term smoking cessation.

The quantitative data on callers will be supplemented with qualitative process data on the counsellors, the Quitlines and other relevant information that can help explain differences in outcomes between countries. To collect this data, a researcher will visit each participating country once, to collect descriptive data on the content and quality of each helpline service, and collect background information pertaining to relevant organisational factors.

Each participating country will be able to compare their results to those of other countries – the results will help to increase the quality standards and effectiveness of each quitline.

The dissemination of the results will take place through the European Network of Quitlines. The recommendations of the project will be implemented practically through the support and guidance of the Network.

What have we acheived so far?

The ENQ implements its objectives by holding regular steering groups, training programmes, and European conferences, bringing established partners and newer European countries together. Technological and web based issues are addressed and the Network has been developing the website and the web based counselling. The training seminars have addressed organizational structures, counsellor training programmes, counselling protocols, latest scientific evidence and research, capacity building, technology, publicity, media skills and fundraising. The network will look at special training programmes from disability access specialists and contact between partners and disability networks. Diversity training programmes will be used to promote contact between partners and minority ethnic networks.

Year One:
The European Network of Quitlines held two meetings in Ireland (Irish Cancer Society in Dublin) and Germany (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum in Heidelberg). A European Conference was also held in Barcelona in September 2001. The event was well supported with delegates from every European member state apart from Austria, and other countries such as Poland, Israel, Norway and Switzerland. Expert’s in Tobacco cessation from Australia, New Zealand and the United States also made presentations during the event.

Year Two:
A support visit from Portugal to the United Kingdom took place and subsequently went live with their Quitline in April 2002 as a direct result of advice, mentoring and help from the European Network of Quitlines.

Italy also was successfully in completing a fully operational line and Greece had two fully operational lines dedicated to smoking cessation.

Karen Bowden was invited to present on the European Network of Quitlines in Warsaw at the 3rd European Conference on Tobacco or Health

Hans Giljam presented on the European Network of Quitlines at the North American Quitlines Conference

Year Three:
The European Network of Quitlines held two steering groups in Lisbon and Athens and two training seminars In Rome and Oslo. This year has seen the launch of the Arabic Quitline UK and the first edition of the Guide to Best Practice, translated and published in three languages, English, French and German. During the seminar in Rome, Stephen Rollinick presented on "Motivational Interviewing in a telephone counselling setting". In Athens delegates presented on training accreditations in Smoking Cessation treatments, and the viability of outsourcing IT call centres.

The Portuguese reported back on successful results 6 months after the first year since establishing the Portuguese Quitline, with the help of mentoring from the European Network of Quitlines.

Steve Crone presented on the European Network of Quitlines at the North American Quitlines Conference on producing a cost effective, evidence based sustainable quitline model, accessible to countries without large budgets


Year Four
The European Network of Quitlines will be holding a seminar in London, during the summer 2004 to officially invite on all ten-accession countries onto the European Network of Quitlines.

The ENQ will be concentrating on the development of ENQ Quality Standard Accreditation, and publication of the helpline model and Code of Practice, incorporating best practice tools, which will inform, support and advance policy development in tobacco as one of the priorities of the Community Health Strategy.

Pan European Research Project – STIVORO/ENQ
The STIVORO/ENQ research will assess what factors influence success in conjunction with Quitlines. Special attention will be paid to the impact of new EU directives on European Quitlines, for example quitline numbers appearing on cigarette packs, in conjunction with the European directive 2001/37/EC on labelling.

The Project will result in concrete recommendations on how Quitlines should be organised and run to have the maximum impact on smoking behaviour. STIVORO/ENQ propose an effectiveness study using one pretest and one postest. The key areas of the questionnaire have been mapped out with member groups. A sample of 500 callers per country will be screened, and then 12 months after the call, the respondents will be interviewed by telephone from a central research centre. Various outcome measures will be used to assess success:

  • Appreciation of the help that was received,
  • Progression in stage of change,
  • Increase in self – efficacy,
  • Use of evidence based cessation method,
  • Reduction in tobacco consumption,
  • Successful quit attempts and long-term smoking cessation.

The quantitative data on callers will be supplemented with qualitative process data on the counsellors, the Quitlines and other relevant information that can help explain differences in outcomes between countries. To collect this data, a researcher will visit each participating country once, to collect descriptive data on the content and quality of each helpline service, and collect background information pertaining to relevant organisational factors.

Each participating country will be able to compare their results to those of other countries – the results will help to increase the quality standards and effectiveness of each quitline.

The dissemination of the results will take place through the European Network of Quitlines. The recommendations of the project will be implemented practically through the support and guidance of the Network.